Dynatron Cooling Fan/Heatsink K17

Dynatron Cooling Fan/Heatsink K17

$30

Dynatron Cooling Fan/Heatsink K17

Dynatron Cooling Fan/Heatsink K17:buyers who shop here marketplace and its localized counterparts, enjoy a highly personalized experience with an unparalleled selection at great value. I'll start by saying that it's a heat sink with an attached fan. For most of us, there's nothing sexy about this. It installs easily, works well and the fan is quiet. The item description doesn't say what sockets it fits, but other reviewers indicated that it fits motherboards with LGA 1155 processor sockets; the computer I was fixing had such a socket, and, as expected, this cooler fit the motherboard perfectly.However, this cooler is tall - about 4-1/2 inches (110mm) tall, so if you have a slim case or a motherboard and drive cages positions so that drives must slide over the processor in order to be installed in the cages, then this cooler may not be for you, even if it fits your motherboard's cooler mounts.This cooler has permanently attached, spring-loaded bolts that screw into standard threaded cooler mounts on the motherboard. If your motherboard has mounts for push-pin installation, you may be better off looking at a cooler that has push pins. (See the INSTALLATION section for more info.)I would have given this cooler 5 stars if the only consideration were its quality, but I'm withholding one for lack of installation instructions, sub-par packaging and for not having everything needed for installation in the box.The rest of the review is my recommended procedure for installation.INSTALLATIONThe package includes the cooler and fan (mine came with the fan detached from the heat sink) and mounting adapters for the motherboard. It does not come with instructions or tools, so if you've never installed a processor cooler, you may want to look up some instructions or videos online.In addition to this cooler, you will need a #2 Phillips head screwdriver. Your screwdriver should have a long, skinny stem; there may not be room to manipulate a short, stubby screwdriver around the cooler to tighten the screws. If you're replacing a failed cooler, you will also need some high concentration isopropyl alcohol and cotton swabs, or some alcohol preps, to clean the old thermal compound off the CPU, possibly a razor blade to gently scrape off dried-on thermal compound, and a clean coffee filter to finish the cleanup. If your old cooler attached with push pins, you may also need a thin, strong blade to gently pry glued-on push pin mounts off the bottom of the motherboard. (Better yet, if you haven't purchased yet and know that your motherboard has push pin mounts, now would be a good time to stop reading and go look up a replacement cooler that mounts with push pins; you will save yourself considerable hassle by not trying to change the mounting system.)The bottom of the heat sink is pre-coated with thermal compound, but the plastic spacers that keep the cooler from clunking around in the box during shipment are not firmly attached to the cooler, so once you open the box, handle with care to ensure that you don't compromise your thermal compound.Now, we're ready to install!- Mounts -If your motherboard already has standard screw mounts for the CPU cooler, skip ahead to the CPU Prep section. If you're building a system with a new motherboard that does not yet have mounts, skip ahead to the next paragraph. If you know that you're going to have to change the cooler mounts (because the existing mounts are for push pins), remove all accessory cards and plugs from the motherboard, unbolt the motherboard from the case, remove it and flip it over. Hopefully, the old mounts are bolted or clipped on and you can simply unbolt or unclip them. If the old mounts are attached with adhesive, grab your blade, carefully work it under one mount and gently, patiently pry the mount off. You don't want to tear the surface of the motherboard, which may contain printed circuit lines which could be ruined if torn. (I warned you this would be a hassle!)The mounts that come with this kit are peel-and-stick. Given what a pain it is to remove that kind of mount, I'm reluctant to recommend installing them, but most people don't routinely change CPU cooler mounts, so if you don't have anything better, you may as well go ahead. The process is simple enough. Peel off the paper from the side of one mount from which the threaded tubes stick up. Hold the motherboard so that you're looking at the underside (the CPU is on the top side, which should be facing AWAY from you), and look at the area directly underneath the CPU. You will see four holes there, one just off each corner of the CPU. Position the mount so its threaded tubes go through two of those holds and press into place. Repeat for the second mount. Reinstall the motherboard into the case.- CPU Prep -If you're installing a new CPU, refer to any instructions that came with it for CPU preparation; none may be required at all.If you're replacing an old cooler, you need to clean the remains of its thermal compound off of the top of the CPU. Use your alcohol and swabs or alcohol prep to wipe still-moist compound off of the processor. Dried-on compound can be gently scraped off with your blade, but be careful not to scratch the top of the CPU while doing this. It's better to avoid using the blade at all if you can. Also avoid touching the CPU, as oils from your fingers will leave fingerprints, which can compromise the action of the new thermal compound.- Fan -My cooler's fan was not mounted on the heat sink. It just snaps right on, but the question is when to do that. This is less of a concern if your motherboard and case leave you lots of room to work; in that case, you can install the cooler on the motherboard first and snap the fan on later. In my case, I knew ahead of time that space was a little tight, so I attached the fan and then test-fitted the cooler. If you have more space in your case, you will find it easier to install the heat sink first and then snap the fan onto it. Just make sure that the pins for the fan facing a part of the motherboard where there are no components sticking up that would prevent you from snapping the fan into place. The cable is pretty long, so no matter which way the fan faces, you shouldn't have a problem getting it to the fan header on the motherboard- Installing the Heat Sink -In principle, this is easy: Simply position the screws over the threaded mounting tubes, and use your screwdriver to tighten the screws all the way. I recommend doing a turn or two per screw and alternating screws in a cross pattern, i.e., start with any screw, turn a couple of times, then go to the screw diagonally across from that one and turn it a couple of times, Now go to one of the two screws you haven't touched yet, and turn one of those a couple of times, then go to its diagonal and turn a couple of times. Repeat until all four screws are fully tightened. For the inexperienced, the hard part here is gauging resistance to determine when screws are fully tightened. Because the screws are spring-loaded, they will all put up some resistance to turning. A screw is fully tightened when that resistance increases dramatically. Do not force a screw past that point, or you may break a screw, strip a threaded tube or damage something else. The other challenge here, especially if you installed the fan first like I did, is that you will need to wield your screwdriver at an angle. This is why I specified a screwdriver with a long, skinny stem at the beginning of this review.That's about it. At this point, snap the fan on if you didn't do so earlier, plug the fan cable into the fan header and you're good to go.max 58% off,washington mall,bombing new workDynatron Cooling Fan/Heatsink K17
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Product description


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Features

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Sumiwish Bunion Corrector, Toe Spacer, Gel Toe Separators, OverlBushwacker 30911-02 Fender FlareFord F150 3.5-Liter EcoBoost Black Lower Bumper Grille Insert -ANY AND ALL GRAPHICS Gregory Caution Enter Shark Kids Room Door4 Pack 7 Gallon Potato Grow Bags, Premium Thickened Breathable NOrOlam Buckwheat Seeds 1 lb Bulk Forage Food Plot Unhulled CoverCreme Brulee Fragrance Oil Perfume Strength for Soap, Bath BombsDrafting Chair Ergonomic Tall Office Chair with Arms Foot Rest B
5 in 1 Advanced and Protein-Rich Hair Care Set for Men and Women
Savogran FBA_10633, 1 gal, Pink
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MOHOO Portable Fan, USB Rechargeable Small Fan, Speed Adjustable
Sllaiss Austria Cubic Zirconia 100 Languages Necklace for Women
Close the Lid, Toilet Decal, Bathroom Art, Toilet sticker
JoyJolt Revere Drinking Glasses, Old Fashioned Glasses 13-Ounce,
Enercell CR 2430 3V/280mAh Lithium Coin Cell

Dynatron Cooling Fan/Heatsink K17

Dynatron Cooling Fan/Heatsink K17:buyers who shop here marketplace and its localized counterparts, enjoy a highly personalized experience with an unparalleled selection at great value. I'll start by saying that it's a heat sink with an attached fan. For most of us, there's nothing sexy about this. It installs easily, works well and the fan is quiet. The item description doesn't say what sockets it fits, but other reviewers indicated that it fits motherboards with LGA 1155 processor sockets; the computer I was fixing had such a socket, and, as expected, this cooler fit the motherboard perfectly.However, this cooler is tall - about 4-1/2 inches (110mm) tall, so if you have a slim case or a motherboard and drive cages positions so that drives must slide over the processor in order to be installed in the cages, then this cooler may not be for you, even if it fits your motherboard's cooler mounts.This cooler has permanently attached, spring-loaded bolts that screw into standard threaded cooler mounts on the motherboard. If your motherboard has mounts for push-pin installation, you may be better off looking at a cooler that has push pins. (See the INSTALLATION section for more info.)I would have given this cooler 5 stars if the only consideration were its quality, but I'm withholding one for lack of installation instructions, sub-par packaging and for not having everything needed for installation in the box.The rest of the review is my recommended procedure for installation.INSTALLATIONThe package includes the cooler and fan (mine came with the fan detached from the heat sink) and mounting adapters for the motherboard. It does not come with instructions or tools, so if you've never installed a processor cooler, you may want to look up some instructions or videos online.In addition to this cooler, you will need a #2 Phillips head screwdriver. Your screwdriver should have a long, skinny stem; there may not be room to manipulate a short, stubby screwdriver around the cooler to tighten the screws. If you're replacing a failed cooler, you will also need some high concentration isopropyl alcohol and cotton swabs, or some alcohol preps, to clean the old thermal compound off the CPU, possibly a razor blade to gently scrape off dried-on thermal compound, and a clean coffee filter to finish the cleanup. If your old cooler attached with push pins, you may also need a thin, strong blade to gently pry glued-on push pin mounts off the bottom of the motherboard. (Better yet, if you haven't purchased yet and know that your motherboard has push pin mounts, now would be a good time to stop reading and go look up a replacement cooler that mounts with push pins; you will save yourself considerable hassle by not trying to change the mounting system.)The bottom of the heat sink is pre-coated with thermal compound, but the plastic spacers that keep the cooler from clunking around in the box during shipment are not firmly attached to the cooler, so once you open the box, handle with care to ensure that you don't compromise your thermal compound.Now, we're ready to install!- Mounts -If your motherboard already has standard screw mounts for the CPU cooler, skip ahead to the CPU Prep section. If you're building a system with a new motherboard that does not yet have mounts, skip ahead to the next paragraph. If you know that you're going to have to change the cooler mounts (because the existing mounts are for push pins), remove all accessory cards and plugs from the motherboard, unbolt the motherboard from the case, remove it and flip it over. Hopefully, the old mounts are bolted or clipped on and you can simply unbolt or unclip them. If the old mounts are attached with adhesive, grab your blade, carefully work it under one mount and gently, patiently pry the mount off. You don't want to tear the surface of the motherboard, which may contain printed circuit lines which could be ruined if torn. (I warned you this would be a hassle!)The mounts that come with this kit are peel-and-stick. Given what a pain it is to remove that kind of mount, I'm reluctant to recommend installing them, but most people don't routinely change CPU cooler mounts, so if you don't have anything better, you may as well go ahead. The process is simple enough. Peel off the paper from the side of one mount from which the threaded tubes stick up. Hold the motherboard so that you're looking at the underside (the CPU is on the top side, which should be facing AWAY from you), and look at the area directly underneath the CPU. You will see four holes there, one just off each corner of the CPU. Position the mount so its threaded tubes go through two of those holds and press into place. Repeat for the second mount. Reinstall the motherboard into the case.- CPU Prep -If you're installing a new CPU, refer to any instructions that came with it for CPU preparation; none may be required at all.If you're replacing an old cooler, you need to clean the remains of its thermal compound off of the top of the CPU. Use your alcohol and swabs or alcohol prep to wipe still-moist compound off of the processor. Dried-on compound can be gently scraped off with your blade, but be careful not to scratch the top of the CPU while doing this. It's better to avoid using the blade at all if you can. Also avoid touching the CPU, as oils from your fingers will leave fingerprints, which can compromise the action of the new thermal compound.- Fan -My cooler's fan was not mounted on the heat sink. It just snaps right on, but the question is when to do that. This is less of a concern if your motherboard and case leave you lots of room to work; in that case, you can install the cooler on the motherboard first and snap the fan on later. In my case, I knew ahead of time that space was a little tight, so I attached the fan and then test-fitted the cooler. If you have more space in your case, you will find it easier to install the heat sink first and then snap the fan onto it. Just make sure that the pins for the fan facing a part of the motherboard where there are no components sticking up that would prevent you from snapping the fan into place. The cable is pretty long, so no matter which way the fan faces, you shouldn't have a problem getting it to the fan header on the motherboard- Installing the Heat Sink -In principle, this is easy: Simply position the screws over the threaded mounting tubes, and use your screwdriver to tighten the screws all the way. I recommend doing a turn or two per screw and alternating screws in a cross pattern, i.e., start with any screw, turn a couple of times, then go to the screw diagonally across from that one and turn it a couple of times, Now go to one of the two screws you haven't touched yet, and turn one of those a couple of times, then go to its diagonal and turn a couple of times. Repeat until all four screws are fully tightened. For the inexperienced, the hard part here is gauging resistance to determine when screws are fully tightened. Because the screws are spring-loaded, they will all put up some resistance to turning. A screw is fully tightened when that resistance increases dramatically. Do not force a screw past that point, or you may break a screw, strip a threaded tube or damage something else. The other challenge here, especially if you installed the fan first like I did, is that you will need to wield your screwdriver at an angle. This is why I specified a screwdriver with a long, skinny stem at the beginning of this review.That's about it. At this point, snap the fan on if you didn't do so earlier, plug the fan cable into the fan header and you're good to go.max 58% off,washington mall,bombing new workDynatron Cooling Fan/Heatsink K17